Hill's Prescription Diet Z/D Dog Food | Review ..

Hill’s Prescription Diet Z/D Canine Dog Food is not rated due to its .
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Science Diet WD dog food is special food designed for dogs that are hypoglycemic (diabetic), have weight and/or digestion problems. Many dogs, like humans, develop diabetes when they become overweight. This formula includes carnitine to help dogs burn fat easier and build more muscle so when a healthy weight is reached, it will be easier to maintain. To help the dog feel fuller longer, the WD dog food includes high levels of fiber. In addition to the benefits of a healthier weight for diabetic dogs, Hill’s Science Diet WD dog food is formulated to reduce the fluctuation of blood glucose levels. Also, like the ZD dog food, the WD dog food has added antioxidants for a healthy immune system. The first 5 ingredients of the WD formula are: Whole Grain Corn, Powdered Cellulose, Chicken by-product Meal, Corn Gluten Meal and Chicken Liver Flavor.
Hill’s Prescription Diet Z/D Canine Dog Food is not rated due to its .
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The Hill’s Prescription Diet Z/D Canine product line includes two dry dog foods, each designed to help with the support of pets with skin or food sensitivities. Hill's Prescription Diet z/d Skin/Food Sensitivities Small Bites Original Dry Dog Food
Photo provided by FlickrWhat’s so valuable about Hill's Prescription Diet Skin/Food Sensitivities z/d® Canine Small Bites Dry Dog Food? Find out here:
Photo provided by FlickrHill's Prescription Diet Z/D Canned Dog Food | Review | Rating | Recalls
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If I'm reviewing this product one star, it's because I cannot rate it any less. Upon switching my dog onto Z/D Canine Small Bites and Z/D Canned Food, my dog experienced pancreatitis and was found to have bladder stones, and also a fatty growth on his eyelid. Considering the Z/D diet is a very strict and expensive diet that strictly prohibits any other food to be given, there could be no other culprit to his disease. He was initially started on Z/D diet for allergies.The Hill’s Prescription Diet Z/D product line includes one canned dog food, a recipe designed to help with the support of pets with skin or food sensitivities.We have a 12 yr old Wheaten Terrier who has been on Hills Prescription Diet (Z/D canned and dry) for many years. He did fine on it for years. In late June he began vomiting and having loose stools. This became an ongoing discussion with our vet. In the meantime the vomiting continued - sometimes it was noticeable food, other times just bile or frothy wetness. He's lost several pounds. Last month our vet did allergy testing and he came up as allergic to soy, fish and rice. One of the main ingredients in Z/D is soy. Our vet felt that it was not likely that the soy in the z/d was bothering our dog because the protein is broken down supposedly beyond the point of reactivity. A slightly different theory about food allergies has spawned Hill’s z/d and z/d ULTRA, and Purina’s HA (Hypo-Allergenic) diets. The idea is that the immune system reacts only to large proteins (such as those found in chicken, corn, or beef) that are absorbed intact. If you chop up all the proteins into little tiny pieces before the dog eats them, they will essentially “fly under the radar” of the immune system and not provoke an allergic reaction. This is a great theory, and allows the use of ordinary ingredients (chicken, in the case of z/d) as long as they go through a special process that breaks down the proteins. The dog can fully utilize the amino acids contained in these proteins, so the food still provides complete nutrition. Purina HA is actually a vegetarian food using soy protein instead of meat.I spoke to the vet as well. The Hill's staff told me we should have been instructed to treat the new Z/D just like a new food and introduce it slowly like any new diet change but oh well. Too late to do that. So nearly $1000.00 and nothing wrong but food I originally questioned and the poor dog is yet to get back on any regular foods as he goes from diarrhea to worst smelling poop ever. Feel like neither the vets or the pet food industry are in sync and our animals are paying the price as well as the owners for avoidable diet issues. Thanks.The only problem with this theory is that it doesn’t always work. There have been cases where an animal has become allergic to z/d or a similar diet. It’s uncommon, but it lends credence to the idea that it’s wise to change foods periodically, so the immune system is not bombarded with the same ingredients year after year. Your dog may be far less likely to develop a food allergy in the first place if you follow this advice.