Signs of Yeast Infection in Dogs

 Get an introduction to how yeast grows in a dog's ears and how to treat this common infection.
Photo provided by Flickr
If you really want to get rid of yeast infections in dogs you have to adopt a multi-pronged approach, including diet, topical treatment and disinfecting infected areas.
Get an introduction to how yeast grows in a dog's ears and how to treat this common infection.
Photo provided by Flickr
Yeast Infection in dogs: Our 20 lb. jack russell terrier was suffering from "beef" allergies so the vet said after a $200 visit in which they put her on prednisone and an antibiotic. She was fine for two weeks after the medication was finished, and then she seemed to be worse. She was on a salmon based dog food (Purina Pro Plan) and her skin became inflamed after eating anything. She was constantly licking, chewing and scratching herself. We bought her a collar so she could no longer lick or chew her skin--then she started to develop crud under her front arms and she was "sweaty" in her groin area and her skin was inflamed and bleeding from where she scratched and she stunk like yeast. I immediately went on the internet and found info about yeast infections in dog and the condition her skin was in was like that described on many differnet sites--hair loss, red, welty, blackened in spots. I immediately put her on 3 benadryl tablets a day to help with the itching, two tablespoons of organice plain yogurt, and 2 acidophilus pills a day. She was already eating chicken and rice and cooked veggies, but I cut back the rice and now only give her chicken, yogurt, and have switched the food to Merrick--a high protein dog food (1/4 cup dry w/a tablespoon of wet, a little chicken and the yogurt for her two meals daily. I have also added a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar to her water dish daily. After 2 days the acidophilus tablets cut the smell. We wiped her skin daily with vinegar and water (50/50) and just gave her a bath yesterday--we had just bathed her 2 days before we bought the collar. She does not smell after the bath except slightly under her front arms--but not noticible unless you rub your hand on her skin. I also cut back on the benadryl as she started to itch less and now she is not taking any at all after 1 week. Her hair is growing back on the hot spot and no inflamation on the skin at all during the treatment. One distinct sign of dogs having a yeast infection is they give out a "musty, moldy-bread" smell.
Photo provided by FlickrGet an introduction to how yeast grows in a dog's ears and how to treat this common infection.
Photo provided by PexelsGet an introduction to how yeast grows in a dog's ears and how to treat this common infection.
Photo provided by Flickr
Malassezia is a normal inhabitant of your dog's or cat's skin, but it becomes problematic only when it changes from a harmless to a pathogenic form. The precise causes of this transformation is unknown, although factors that suppress or imbalance the immune system are often involved. Some factors that may contribute to yeast infections include allergies to fleas, , food allergies, prolonged use of or , hormonal disorders like or , , chemotherapeutic drugs, and external skin parasites. Pets with excessive skin folds such as the brachycephalic breeds of dogs (Bulldogs, Pugs) are also at increased risk. is recommended for yeast of the ears, which often results in dramatic response of clinical symptoms. This product works through the action of antifungal enzymes that literally break up wax and discharge from the ears. For pets with yeast infection on the skin, some excellent products include topical spray (for dogs), , and . The spray works through natural tea tree oil, while the shampoos work with the use of . In severe cases of yeast overgrowth, oral or is recommended to help alleviate the infection. Symptoms of yeast infection may include intense itchiness, skin irritation, and inflammation, especially around the ears, between the paw pads and digits, and on the nasal folds, anal area, armpits, and neck. Skin redness, sores, and sticky discharge are often secondary to yeast overgrowth. Greasy coat and/or hair loss is also frequently seen, as well as foul-smelling, rancid skin. When occuring in the ears, yeast infections may lead to yellowish green, musty smelling discharge. Some breeds of dogs predisposed to yeast include West Highland White Terriers, Poodles, Basset Hounds, Cocker Spaniels, and German Shepherds. Take precautions to prevent the yeast infection from recurring. Towel dry your dog's ears when they get wet from swimming to prevent moisture from accumulating in the ear canals. Check your dog's ears often for signs of irritation or unpleasant odor.