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This knowledge has allowed us to formulate the optimal diet for your dog's special needs
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Reducing purines in food is an effective way to reduce the risk of urate stones. Because most high-protein foods are also high in purines, veterinarians often recommend switching urate-forming dogs to a low-protein diet. However, it is not the quantity of protein that causes urate problems, it’s the type of protein. Dalmatians and other urate-prone dogs thrive on protein-rich diets that are low in purines, while these same dogs can develop stones after eating low-protein foods that contain even small amounts of high-purine ingredients. Low-protein diets can lead to nutritional deficiencies when fed to adult dogs for long periods, and they are not appropriate for puppies and pregnant or nursing females at all. (See below.)

Canine Urinary SO Small Dog is a complete and balanced diet specifically designed for small breed adult dogs at risk of developing lower urinary tract disease.
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What's so valuable about Hills Prescription Diet c/d Multicare Canine Urinary Care Dry Food? Find out here: * Made with premium ingredients* For prevention and maintenance of lower urinary tract disease in adult dogs* Formulated with reduced levels of magnesium, a natural component of kidney stones*… Canine Urinary SO Moderate Calorie is a complete and balanced diet for adult dogs predisposed to weight gain
Photo provided by PexelsCanine Urinary SO Small Dog is a complete and balanced diet specifically designed for small breed adult dogs
Photo provided by PexelsCanine Urinary SO is a complete and balanced diet for adult dogs formulated to aid in the nutritional management of calcium oxalate and struvite urolithiasis.
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A high-quality, all natural diet free of and is vital for dogs of all shapes, sizes, and breeds, but it's even more critical for the vitality and overall wellness of your Dalmatian. Thanks to their unique uric acid metabolism and the resulting genetic propensity for urinary stone formation, Dalmatians need a diet rich in high-quality, human-grade protein sources but low in purine content. There are also the important issues of price and palatability to consider. Some of the vet diet formulas can cost upwards of $3 a day to feed a 50 lb. dog, compared to $1 or less for most premium healthy pet food brands. Plus, many dogs do not take well to the diets – not at all surprising given the lack of protein sources in many cases – and need to have gravies (which can be high in purines) or treats added to the foods before they'll eat them. This ideal dietary balance helps to foster alkaline urine and keeps uric acid in check. If this diet sounds familiar, it's likely because low-purine diets for Dalmatian dogs are similar in nature to those recommended for humans suffering from gout or kidney stones. Some of the newer scientifically developed premium wellness pet foods for dogs and cats meet the ideal diet criteria while also delivering highly nutritious, balanced wellness diets that can boost your pet's immune system and give him or her a shinier coat, healthier teeth and gums, and more energy. in particular has developed several premium wellness dog food formulas that offer the highest quality human-grade protein and grain sources without using large amounts of high-purine ingredients. Additionally, since some Dals are allergic to various flours and grains, such as soy, corn, and wheat, these potential food allergens need to be kept in mind when forming your particular Dalmatian's dietary plan. Nutritional supplements such as potassium citrates (for preventing ) and sodium bicarbonate (for preventing ) may also be encouraged for dogs with histories of or genetically predisposed to kidney and/or urinary stone problems. Then there are the issues of price and palatability. Some of the formulas can cost upwards of $2 a day to feed a 50 lb. dog, compared to $1 or less for most premium healthy pet food brands. Plus, many dogs do not take well to the diets – not at all surprising given the lack of protein sources in many cases – and need to have gravies (which can be high in purines) or treats added to the foods before they'll eat them.