Dog Leash Training: Teaching Your Dog to Walk on a Leash

 of How to Train an Older Dog to Walk Calmly on a Leash was reviewed by  on March 20, 2017.
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It takes a special person to dedicate time, love, and patience to a pet. There is a lot of care and responsibility required, especially when it comes to training or learning how to walk a dog. There are many other factors to consider, from buying the right collar and leash, to setting expectations, to rewarding your dog for a job well done. It will take time but soon you will know what to do so that you and your pet can make the walking experience a great one.
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Is your dog pulling you on the leash? If so, then you’ve come to the right place. In this training guide, I’m going to share with you four training steps to getting your dog to walk nicely on a loose leash with you and to stop pulling once and for all. I first leash train my dogs one at a time. I only start to walk them together after they are good with one-on-one walks.
Photo provided by FlickrI hope it works for you! these are scientifically proven training methods to train dogs to walk on a loose leash, best wishes!
Photo provided by FlickrI distinguish between ‘walking beside me’ and ‘walking on leash’. Mostly I train a dog off-leash. The leash tends to just get in the way 🙁
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Most leash pulling begins as soon as the dog sees the leash and knows she's about to go for a walk. If the walk begins out of control, the precedent is set for the entire walk. Before expecting your dog to calmly walk beside you on leash, train her to be calm when you are putting her collar and leash on!Most dogs learn very quickly that they must sit while the leash is being attached to the collar. They usually tremble with excitement, ready to explode into a frenzy as soon as this phase is accomplished. If your dog bolts toward the door, dragging you behind, then the situation is still out of control. Simply hold onto the leash, stand still and let your dog dance, ricochet and bounce around at the end of the leash. It may take 5 minutes or more, but she will soon realize that you are not going anywhere and will begin to calm down. When this happens, praise her for being good. After another minute or so, take your first step, but NOT towards the door. Instead, walk your dog around your house, garage or yard to give her a chance to practice her 'not-pulling' skills. Every time she pulls, lunges or strains on the leash, simply stand still again. When she calms down, talk to her, praise her calmly and quietly. Try to keep her attention on yourself instead of the door that leads to outside. When you feel that your dog is in control and she is walking nicely without pulling in your house or yard, then it is time to proceed to the great outdoors.Ask her to sit-stay while you are putting on her leash. If she does not stay, the walk is delayed until she does. Don't give in or she will learn that it's OK to be out of control. If your dog doesn't have a reliable sit-stay, then practice training her to sit-stay without the distraction of the prospect of a walk. If you do not know how to teach a reliable sit-stay, enroll in an obedience training class.One of the first things you need to teach your young puppy is how to behave on a leash. It is a crucial skill to master for both you and your dog's future. After training a puppy to walk on a leash they are much safer and more manageable, plus it means walkies is an experience you can both look forward to and enjoy.