PTSD Service Dogs & PTSD Service Dog Training

Resources for finding other dog trainers who might have experience with service dogs:
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2. If you're training a puppy, you must wait for it to finish growing before teaching tasks such as wheelchair pulling and bracing (Mobility Service (Assistance) Dogs Only)
Some Frequently Asked Questions about Dynamic Dogs service dog training:
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We train service animals for multiple disabilities. The ADA defines a service animal as any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. Service animals perform some of the functions and tasks that the individual with a disability cannot perform for him or herself. Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, bracing, retrieving for those with mobility issues, interrupting behaviors related to autism, PTSD or anxiety attacks, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA. If you are interested in a therapy dog or emotional support animal (ESA), we can help you with training. Dogs as a pet or companion can provide an amazing therapeutic benefit to individuals with depression, anxiety, autism or Aspergers, PTSD, or other psychiatric challenges. However, they may not have full public access like a service animal. Did you know that service dogs can be trained to be diabetic alert dogs? Meet .
Photo provided by FlickrTypes of dogs trained: Service, Hearing, Guide, Social/Therapy
Photo provided by FlickrTypes of dogs trained: Service, Hearing, Seeing Eye, Seizure, Psychiatric, ESA, Autism, Mobility
Photo provided by Flickr
Service dogs are trained to assist a person with his or her disability. Per the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) a trained service dog is allowed to accompany its person in public places as an accommodation for the person's disability. In response to many inquiries from disabled citizens who want to train a dog to be their assistance dog, but tell us they do not know how much training or what kinds of training to give the dog, IAADP has developed a set of Minimum Training Standards for Public Access. These are drawn from the Minimum Training Standards for Service Dogs first established a decade ago by Assistance Dogs International (ADI) with consumer input from IAADP. Visit A. It depends. The ADA makes a distinction between psychiatric service animals and emotional support animals. If the dog has been trained to sense that an anxiety attack is about to happen and take a specific action to help avoid the attack or lessen its impact, that would qualify as a service animal. However, if the dog's mere presence provides comfort, that would not be considered a service animal under the ADA.Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA. As the only ACCREDITED service dog training program in Indiana, ICAN has brought together dogs, offenders, and people living with disabilities to provide hope for more enriched and independent living.In addition to the provisions about service dogs, the Department’s revised ADA regulations have a new, separate provision about miniature horses that have been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. (Miniature horses generally range in height from 24 inches to 34 inches measured to the shoulders and generally weigh between 70 and 100 pounds.) Entities covered by the ADA must modify their policies to permit miniature horses where reasonable. The regulations set out four assessment factors to assist entities in determining whether miniature horses can be accommodated in their facility. The assessment factors are (1) whether the miniature horse is housebroken; (2) whether the miniature horse is under the owner’s control; (3) whether the facility can accommodate the miniature horse’s type, size, and weight; and (4) whether the miniature horse’s presence will not compromise legitimate safety requirements necessary for safe operation of the facility.