Learn about what vaccine or test is recommend for puppies and dogs.

NON CORE VACCINES are vaccines that are recommended for some dogs depending on their lifestyle.
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Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza and Parvovirus (DAPPv): Commonly called the “distemper shot,” this combination vaccine actually protects against five diseases: canine distemper, adenovirus, hepatitis, parainfluenza, and parvovirus. It’s given to puppies in a series of three vaccines and then given every year to adult dogs. Along with rabies, DAPPv is considered a set of core vaccines: those universally recommended for dogs no matter what the circumstance.
Typically rabies vaccinations for dogs have 3 year efficacy. VIP Petcare strongly recommends annual fecal testing for all dogs.
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Currently, there are geographically defined and individually chosen recommendations for dogs. A number of controversies surrounding adverse reactions to vaccines have resulted in authoritative bodies revising their guidelines as to the type, frequency, and methods/locations for dog vaccination. Non-core dog vaccine. Generally recommended only for dogs with a high risk for exposure to Lyme disease-carrying ticks.
Photo provided by FlickrSee Tables 4 and 5 for a summary of recommendations for adult dogs and cats that are considered overdue for revaccination.
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Boosters
It is necessary to boost vaccinations (vaccinating again in a certain time period) to allow for the growth and expansion of the immune response in order to fight off infection upon exposure to the actual disease.

It is recommended to keep your puppy away from unvaccinated dogs while the vaccination process is going on and away from places of multiple dog exposure, if vaccination status of all dogs is not known.





It should also be noted that much research in the area of companion animal vaccinology is required to generate optimal recommendations for vaccination of dogs and cats. As further research is performed, and as new vaccines become available on the market, this document will be continuously updated and modified.Thefollowing vaccine protocol is offered for those dogs where minimal vaccinationsare advisable or desirable. The schedule is one I recommend and should not be interpretedto mean that other protocols recommended by a veterinarian would be lesssatisfactory. It’s a matter of professional judgment and choice.
For initial puppy vaccination (£ 16 weeks), one dose of vaccine containing modified live virus (MLV) CPV, CDV, and CAV-2 is recommended every 3-4 weeks from 6-8 weeks of age, with the final booster being given no sooner than 16 weeks of age. For dogs older than 16 weeks of age, two doses of vaccine containing modified live virus (MLV) CPV, CDV, and CAV-2 given 3-4 weeks apart are recommended. After a booster at 6 months to one year, revaccination is recommended every 3 years thereafter, ideally using a product approved for 3-year administration, unless there are special circumstances that warrant more or less frequent revaccination. Note that recommendations for killed parvovirus vaccines and recombinant CDV vaccines are different from the above. These vaccines are not currently stocked by our drug room or routinely used at the VMTH. We do not recommend vaccination with CAV-1 vaccines, since vaccination with CAV-2 results in immunity to CAV-1, and the use of CAV-2 vaccines results in less frequent adverse events.Core vaccines are recommended for all puppies and dogs with an unknown vaccination history. The diseases involved have significant morbidity and mortality and are widely distributed, and in general, vaccination results in relatively good protection from disease. These include vaccines for canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus (CAV), and rabies. In addition, the leptospirosis vaccine is now recommended as a core vaccine for dogs in California because the disease has the potential to occur in any dog (even in urban environments), can be life-threatening, and the vaccines are considered safe and efficacious, with recent improvements in safety over the last decade.Multiple leptospiral serovars are capable of causing disease in dogs, and minimal cross-protection is induced by each serovar. Currently available vaccines do not contain all serovars, and duration of immunity is probably about 1 year. However, leptospirosis is not uncommon in northern Californian dogs both from urban backyards and also with exposure histories involving livestock and areas frequented by wild mammals. In addition, the disease can be fatal or have high morbidity, and also has zoonotic potential. Therefore, we suggest annual vaccination of all dogs with vaccines containing all four Leptospira serovars (Grippotyphosa, Pomona, Canicola and Icterohaemorrhagiae). The initial vaccination should be followed by a booster 2-4 weeks later, and the first vaccine be given no earlier than 12 weeks of age. In general, Leptospira vaccines have been associated with more severe postvaccinal reactions (acute anaphylaxis) than other vaccines. The recent introduction of vaccines with reduced amounts of foreign protein has reduced this problem. Reaction rates for vaccines containing Leptospira, while higher than those for vaccines that do not contain Leptospira, are still low in incidence (in one study, Leptospira vaccines should be avoided if possible. The VMTH does not recommend administering different vaccine antigens at separate time points because it reduces the chance that vaccines will be administered and there is poor evidence that it decreases the risk of reactions occurring.