Housebreaking a Dog: How to Potty Train a Puppy

Bathroom manners (potty training, house training) for puppies and adult dogs.
Photo provided by Flickr
How to Potty Train a Puppy Fast!

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Videos I reference in this episode:
How to Leash Train your Puppy:

The ART of Communicating with a Dog:

How to teach your Dog to STOP BEGGING and SETTLE DOWN:
When you're frustrated with your dog about potty training problems, he can tell!
Photo provided by Flickr
Do not use treats when potty training as it takes the dog's focus off of the business at hand and puts it on the food. You do not want the dog's brain to be on food when it is time to relieve itself. This often causes a dog to not completely finish eliminating because the dog is looking and waiting for food. The dog will often come back inside the home and go to the bathroom again after just being out. Keep the focus on the task at hand. Rewards for pottying should be the relief the dog feels when it empties itself, your happiness that the dog did the right thing, along with verbal praise, a pet and/or back scratch. Dogs can feel when the humans are happy. You’ll want to have the following items as you begin potty training your dog:
Photo provided by FlickrHere is a little something that you need to remember when potty training your dog:
Photo provided by FlickrWhat our Deaf Dogs Rock potty training method does is achieve three specific goals.
Photo provided by Flickr
Although most dogs are trained to , it sometimes makes sense to teach your dog to have an indoor potty area (newspapers, pee pee pads, litter box or turf box). This method is most commonly used by people with very small dogs, people who are unable to get outside easily due to health issues or living in a high-rise, and people who work such long hours that their dog can’t reasonably be expected to hold it and wait to go outside.Before you start training, decide where you want your puppy’s potty area to be. If at all possible, set up your dog’s papers, pee pads, turf tray or litter box where you want them to be long-term. Although not impossible, training him to use a new indoor area – and to stop going in the original area he was trained to use – is tricky, so avoid having to change the location of his papers, litter box, or training pads if at all possible. Putting your dog’s potty area in a room with linoleum, tile or other hard flooring is better than putting it on carpet, since there may be occasional overflow or misses. In the early phases of training, if your dog’s potty area has to be in a carpeted area, you may want to buy a linoleum remnant or waterproof plastic tarp to put under his papers or litter box, to prevent any overflow from getting to the carpet. When training your dog to use an indoor potty area, you must supervise him as outlined in , and you may want to use in the early phases of your training.This is the easiest indoor potty training method for most puppies and dogs. You’ll create a confinement area where your dog can be left when he is unsupervised. The area will have a bed, food and water dishes, toys or chewies, and an area for your dog’s potty pads or other potty area. As your puppy becomes reliable about using his potty pads, you’ll gradually increase his area of confinement until he’s loose in the house and reliable about taking himself to his potty pads when he needs to go.