Stop Leash Pulling – WHY do dogs and puppies do it?

Get my list of 6 training techniques you can use to help your dog to stop pulling on leash.
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A nice and easy walk could well be turned into a complete mess and it ruins your fun if your BC loves pulling on the leash and won’t stop doing it even if you yell at him. An untrained dog with leash pulling habit will make him drag you around during a walk from one block to another. Trust me; it can be a seriously embarrassing situation for the owner, when the dog is dragging him around, especially if you are in a park and people watching you manhandled by your dog.
of How to Stop a Dog from Pulling on Its Leash was reviewed by  on March 16, 2017.
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Consistency is important when teaching loose-leash walking. If you stop when your dog pulls four out of five times (rather than every time), she’ll learn that pulling can still result in the intended reward — moving forward. She’s thinking, “If it worked once, it will probably work again.” Be patient: If your dog has learned to pull on the leash, it might take her a while to stop pulling forward, even if you are stopped. A “Random Walk” to Stop Your Dog or Puppy from Pulling on His Leash
Photo provided by FlickrThe safe, effective way to redirect and stop your dog from pulling on the leash
Photo provided by FlickrPerson: Dogalini! Stop it! [Person pulls leash to get it away from Dog. Dog tugs back.]
Photo provided by Flickr
Remember, do not go forward if the leash is tight. You can go backwards, turn around and walk back or you can stand still. Just not forward. It is okay for the dog or puppy to be in front of you as long as the leash is not tight. As soon as there is any pressure on the leash, stop in your track and wait for him to come back. If he’s taking too long to come back, start walking backwards or simply walk another way. Once he is by your side, praise him and start walking again. Take your time and be patient. Until he no longer pulls keep walks short and train.Your dog continues to pull because he continues to be rewarded for the experience. He pulls and he gets to the car. He pulls and he gets to greet that other dog in the neighborhood. He pulls and the lady across the street tells him how lovely he is. What gets rewarded, gets repeated. So, if you want your dog to stop pulling, don’t take another step as long as the leash is tight.Your dog continues to pull because he continues to be rewarded for the experience. He pulls and he gets to the car. He pulls and he gets to greet that other dog in the neighborhood. He pulls and the lady across the street tells him how lovely he is. What gets rewarded, gets repeated. So, if you want your dog to stop pulling, don’t take another step as long as the leash is tight.Simply stop dead in your tracks without saying a word when you feel tension on your leash. Your dog will soon look back at you, wondering what is going on. The second he looks back and acknowledges you and the leash subsequently relaxing, you say “Good Job” with excitement and begin your walk again.If you are consistent with this exercise and don’t give up, your dog will learn that walking politely on his leash means a longer walk. No manners on a leash equals no walk.The best way is to stop pulling is to stop reinforcing the pulling. A dog pulls because pulling works to get him where he wants to go. If you stop the walk when he pulls, he will learn that pulling does not work to get him what he wants, and that is to move forward to take in all the sights and smells. Resume the walk when your dog has backed up enough to put some slack in the leash, or you have lured him back into position at your side with a loose leash.If at all possible, avoid the first response that occurs to most humans, which is to stop moving, tighten up your dog’s leash and/or pull him close as the other guy passes. Dogs have an opposition reflex—meaning when you pull them one way, they pull back the other. Pain or discomfort caused by walking or training equipment (whether or not the equipment is specifically designed to cause it) can become associated with the other dog, and a dog who initially was just frustrated at not being able to greet may begin to warn off other dogs to avoid that feeling. And if your dog is already worried about whatever’s coming down the pike, heavy restraint can make him feel like a sitting duck. Dogs who feel like they can’t flee are more likely to fight.Firstly, forget punishment. The dog has bad leash manners because he has been allowed to develop them by people, he thinks pulling is the way to walk, and he only does it because he's happy to be out and about - don't ruin his walking experience by hurting him. Secondly, avoid 'quick fix' tools designed to 'teach' using pain or discomfort. There is no tool that teaches the dog not to pull - it's simply a crutch used to physically stop the dog pulling while they wear that tool. Put them in a normal collar or harness, and hey presto, your being dragged all over again.