Perfect Pace dog halter stops pulling instantly! - Bold Lead Designs

Not a Muzzle: Dogs can pant, eat treats, drink, and pick up toys while wearing this halter.
Photo provided by Flickr
DO NOT use a head halter that is not adjustable under the nose piece. There is another popular, sometimes cheaper head halter that is not adjustable under the snout, and because it cannot be tightened the fabric strap can pull and even run in your dog’s eye. The ability to adjust the halter under the nose keeps this from happening.
Learn whether you should use a halter and which leash is best for walking your dog.
Photo provided by Flickr
This halter has been a huge help in teaching my service dog (still an older puppy) to ignore other dogs and to pay more attention to me. I wish I had used it from the start.
I got the braided halter to start with; may eventually go to the leather model. The braided one is well-made, and Bold Lead’s customer service was extremely helpful telling me what I needed to know to make a good decision between the two. They also offered to give me some training as to how to use it on my dog, which I encourage anyone to accept. Not a Muzzle: Dogs can pant, eat treats, drink, and pick up toys while wearing this halter.
Photo provided by FlickrHead halters are best for very strong pullers and aggressive dogs since it gives control of the head.
Photo provided by FlickrHead halters are best for very strong pullers and aggressive dogs since it gives control of the head.
Photo provided by Flickr
Head haltersfor dogs,commonly sold as the , or , are devices that fit over a dog’s nose and neck. The halters are not to be mistaken for a muzzle, but they are a walking device that gives more control than a collar or harness. The basic premise of a halter is: Where the head goes, the body will follow.
Head halters are beneficial training tools, but there is also the possibility for misuse. For this reason, involving a professional, starting with your veterinarian, is always recommended to see if the head halter is the right fit for your dog.

Head halters fit similarly to a halter on a horse; the leash attaches just under the mouth. There may be some similarity between the head halter tightening on the muzzle and a mother dog correcting her puppies by putting her mouth over their nose. Opponents of head halters note if the dog hits the end of the leash and his head is snapped back. There is also the possibility for misuse of the halter if sharp-jerk corrections are made. Head halters that fit too tightly can also cause eye damage or rub fur off the muzzle. Some also become distressed or depressed from the halter, especially if gradual adjustment to the device is not made.
Not every dog is a candidate for a head halter, but the devices are valuable in certain training situations. Dogs with issues are one example where head halters may be recommended. Owners with limited physical ability walking a hard-to-control dog can also better direct the dog with a head halter than with other walking tools. The halter minimizes forward motion, such as pulling, and gives directional control. By pulling gently upward, the person can use the halter to close the dog's mouth, which can help control nipping and mouthing. When the halter is used in combination with training a desired response, such as , it can be a transitional training tool that is used temporarily to teach a particular behavior.
The head halter has a strap that encircles the muzzle, and where the nose goes the body follows (“power steering for dogs”). Secondly, dogs pulling on neck collars can injure themselves as the collar presses into the trachea and neck. In addition, ocular pressure (pressure within the eyes) may increase with pressure against a neck collar, which may prove a risk to dogs with glaucoma. Dogs that pull may also be at greater risk of becoming aggressive to strangers or dogs that they meet on walks if they are punished or choked each time they meet a new person or animal. Thirdly, some head halters give you control over the dog’s mouth, which may help control barking, turn the head away from the stimulus and reduce the risk of dog biting. However, if you know your pet has an aggression problem, a muzzle may be more suitable as it will prevent biting without having to rely on owner control.