Puppy Adoption :: Search by color, age, breed ..

When you buy a dog from a pet store, you're supporting cruel puppy mills
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Be wary of excuses such as "AKC hasn't sent the papers yet." The standard processing time of any AKC registration item is generally only a few days. If a breeder is doing his paperwork in a timely manner, there is no reason the AKC Dog Registration Application form should not be available. If this document is not available at the time of delivery, wait until the breeder receives it before you pay for and take home your puppy. Once you have completed the transaction, there is often no recourse for an unsatisfied buyer.
The rationale is that an adult shelter dog is an unknown quantity, so buying or adopting a Siberian Husky puppy is safer
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Pet stores tend to regard dogs as "merchandise," but these outfits don't always have a return policy or other guarantees in case you have taken home an unhealthy dog. Some stores, however, have arrangements with local animal shelters to display and find homes for shelter dogs. The care the animals receive in these stores is comparable to that of a shelter -- generally higher than in most pet shops -- and in return for their effort, the stores benefit from selling food, toys and other essentials to the adoptive family. Before you buy your puppy from a pet store, ask the store manager who supplies the animals -- and insist on documented proof. The rationale is that an adult shelter dog is an unknown quantity, so buying or adopting a Collie puppy is safer. Actually, the opposite is closer to the truth.
Photo provided by FlickrFeb 17, 2012 - As much as dog lovers melt over a cute, cuddly puppy, when it comes time to actually buy a dog, price sensitivity enters into it
Photo provided by FlickrIn both cases, you're probably buying a dog from a puppy mill, one of the horrendous breeding farms that churn out litters of puppies in the worst conditions.
Photo provided by Flickr
Where to buy a dogSome people want to get a purebred puppy and think their only option is to go to a local pet store or dog breeder near them. That's certainly one way to get a purebred dog or puppy, but many people don’t realize that sometimes purebred dogs and puppies end up in shelters and need homes as well.Any dog of any age can end up in a shelter. Someone may breed their purebred dog to sell the puppies but then not find homes for all the purebred puppies. Or someone might buy a puppy from a breeder or a pet store, and then be unable to keep the puppy. Perhaps they cannot afford the care, or there is a crisis in the family that requires them to find a new home for their dog. They may not be able to return the puppy to the dog breeder or pet store, and so the purebred puppy might be taken to a shelter to find a new home.Adopting vs BuyingWhen people want to buy a dog or buy a puppy from a breeder or pet store, more and more people are first searching their local animal shelter or purebred rescue group to see if there might be a purebred dog or puppy they might like to adopt. In most cases this is a cheaper way to buy a puppy. Adopting a pet from a shelter or rescue also saves a life, so if you are looking to find a breeder or visit a pet store, please consider as an option adopting a dog from your animal shelter or rescue organization near you.When people want to buy a dog or buy a puppy from a breeder or pet store, more and more people are first searching their local animal shelter or purebred rescue group to see if there might be a purebred dog or puppy they might like to adopt. In most cases this is a cheaper way to buy a puppy. Adopting a pet from a shelter or rescue also saves a life, so if you are looking to find a breeder or visit a pet store, please consider as an option adopting a dog from your animal shelter or rescue organization near you.Any dog of any age can end up in a shelter. Someone may breed their purebred dog to sell the puppies but then not find homes for all the purebred puppies. Or someone might buy a puppy from a breeder or a pet store, and then be unable to keep the puppy. Perhaps they cannot afford the care, or there is a crisis in the family that requires them to find a new home for their dog. They may not be able to return the puppy to the dog breeder or pet store, and so the purebred puppy might be taken to a shelter to find a new home.Responsible breeders don't sell their puppies to the first person who shows up with cash in hand. Too often, unsuspecting people buy puppies from puppy mills, or sometimes neighbors who breed their dog to make a little money or simply because they have a dog "with papers." Too often, the result is puppies in poor health or with temperament problems that may not be discovered right away.